Sustainability Stars

The Sustainability Stars Program recognizes qualified applicants for sustainability efforts in land development and infrastructure in Greater West Houston. This includes:  Investigation, Investment, Integration, Inspiration, and Innovation.

 

The WHA Sustainability Stars Program provides both a means to recognize and encourage sustainable practices, and serves as a means to gather insights and reliable information on the value provided by sustainable infrastructure and development practices. Therefore, the WHA Sustainable Infrastructure Committee recognizes projects that explore or implements sustainable infrastructure plans. Applicants are encouraged to apply in pre-design and to continue updating their applications as the project progresses as each project/team can receive multiple awards.

 

The 5 I’s – Qualification Standards


INVESTIGATION STAR  

Recognizes project sponsors
who study or evaluate the use
of sustainability elements in
their project prior to any
project implementation
activities.

INVESTMENT STAR

Recognizes project
sponsors who include
sustainability
elements in the
design of their
project.

INTEGRATION STAR

Recognizes project
sponsors who include
sustainability elements in
a constructed project.

INSPIRATION STAR 

Recognizes project
sponsors who receive
qualifying third‐party
recognition for
sustainability
elements in a project

INNOVATION STAR

Recognizes project sponsors
who include some
sustainability program or
element in their project that is
not otherwise identified in
this matrix

 

How to apply:

  1. Fill out the Sustainability Stars Application
  2. Submit it by clicking this link or email it to Jennifer@Westhouston.org
  3. Contact Jennifer@Westhouston.org to submit the $250 Application Fee

 


Locations of Sustainability Stars Projects

 


2020 Sustainability Stars Award Winners:

Cinco MUD 1 Waste-Water Treatment Plant Water Re-Use

Investigation

Investment

Integration

Innovation

Inspiration

The Cinco MUD 1 District aggressively pursued opportunities to reduce the amount of fresh groundwater consumed within its service area through a variety of initiatives, including conservation, education, brackish desalination, and reclaimed water reuse for irrigation. Those measures are each designed to reduce water use and thereby reduce the impacts and high costs of subsidence. By proactively engaging its program to include reclaimed water, the District has continued addressing the three major problems facing their region today: (1) drought, (2) subsidence, and (3) rising water rates due to conversion requirements.

 

Towne Lake Water Re-Use

Investigation

Investment

Integration

 

“A Community Connected by Water”

From its conception in 2006, Caldwell Companies has sought to create Towne Lake as a unique community where residents and services could be connected by water. They envisioned boat docks and marinas augmenting traditional walking trails as a means for navigating the neighborhood. By transforming required on-site detention into navigable waterways, Towne Lake has succeeded in the original vision and created an amenity out of necessity. Not stopping there, Caldwell made the decision to also use lake water for irrigation purposes. Extensive purple pipe systems are employed across the 2,400-acre community to provide irrigation for roadway medians and adjacent landscaping, parks, trails and recreation areas. The lake system thus provides protection from flooding, exciting recreation opportunities, and environmentally responsible water reuse.

 

Cinco MUD 1 De-Salination Water Plant

Investigation

Investment

Integration

 

The District has built a state-of-the-art microfiltration reverse osmosis microfiltration plant (“Cinco Desal Plant”) that is designed to provide approximately 2.75 million galls per day of water to the community. The Cinco Desal Plant uses a complex system of filters, pumps, membranes, pipes, and mixes the product water with existing Evangeline Aquifer water to produce high quality, clean drinking water to homes within the service area. Whereas all other water wells in the area, including the District’s twelve existing water wells, are pumping water from the shallow Evangeline or Chicot Aquifers, the District has drilled a well into the Jasper Aquifer, a deeper source of water whose water has a higher salt content than that of the Evangeline and Chicot Aquifers. Because of the depth and the existence of a layer of rock and clay known as the Burkeville Confining Layer, it is expected that the groundwater withdrawals will be less likely to cause subsidence.


2019 Sustainability Stars Award Winners:

Conrad Sauer Park & Detention Basin

Investigation

Investment

Integration

Innovation

This project transformed a City owned, concrete, pumped detention basin into a beautiful amenity, while going above and beyond in serving its original purpose.  It is completely unique to the area, not only with the level of collaboration required, but with the transformation of the concrete basin surface using the geoweb “green roof” system.  This project is already starting to inspire planning of other projects in the Houston area. The formerly concrete basin that had a single purpose of stormwater mitigation was turned into a lush vegetated basin that added detention, environmental quality benefits (water quality and trash filtering), a park and additional transportation connectivity for the community.  Ecological benefits can also be observed with the new-found presence of pollinators and birds.

Read more…


2018 Sustainability Stars Award Winners:

Bridgeland Creek Parkway Sections 7 & 8

Investigation 

Investment

The integration of sustainable infrastructure was a major consideration when planning the Bridgeland development, an 11,400-acre master-planned community in Northwest Harris County. The developer, Howard Hughes Corp., aimed to create a community that seamlessly blended natural features with modern facilities and amenities while being environmentally conscious. BGE engineered more than 3,000 acres of lakes, trails, and parks into the design as well as an innovative and forward-thinking water reuse and purple pipe system that reduces the community’s overall demand for treated, potable (drinking) water. Bridgeland’s wastewater treatment plant was designed to treat water to Type 1 effluent standards, water that is clean enough to discharge into public lakes. Bridgeland also has rights to a certain volume of water in the adjacent Cypress Creek. These two sources of water are pumped into Bridgeland’s interconnected lake system to keep it at a steady level.   Read more…

 

 

Cross Creek Ranch Polishing Pond

Investigation

Investment

Integration

Innovation

The Cross Creek Ranch Polishing Pond was awarded the Investigation, Investment, Integration & Innovation stars. The polishing pond is a residential community infrastructure that is built to be step 1 of 3 in a water management system that repurposes wastewater into use for community landscaping. The use of a 45-acre wetland basin as the base for the project ensures that once the water has completed its journey through the system “any discharge should essentially be devoid of biologically impaired pollutants and high concentrations of oxygen.” This project is the first to earn the Innovation Sustainability star and is owned by Johnson Development and engineered by BGE, Inc. & SWA Group. Read more…

 

 

Queenston Manor Apartment Homes

Inspiration

Investigation

Investment

Integration

The Queenston Manor Apartment Homes was award the Inspiration, Integration,Investigation & Investment stars. This apartment complex uses multiple low impact development (LID) techniques to reduce the requirement for detention and increase the value of the property by building more apartment homes. Though it may appear to look like any other apartment complex in the area, with cisterns below the permeable parking surfaces and stormwater raingardens built into the open green spaces, EHRA Engineering helped develop a worthwhile and environmentally friendly solution after industry detention standards wouldn’t do. Read More…


2017 Sustainability Stars Award Winners:

Stonebrook Estates

Investment 

Integration

Stonebrook Estates, a 51.4-acre single-family residential, low-impact development, is located near Tomball, Texas. The 135 lot development consists of approximately 70 completed homes, each with an average sales price over $500,000. Stonebrook was developed with LID/GI amenities in mind and a hybrid stormwater management system, which uses natural drainage systems coupled with traditional storm sewers to adequately direct stormwater around and away from the homes.   Read more…

 

 

Jersey Meadows Stormwater Detention Basin in Jersey Village

Investigation

Investment

Integration

The project team designed the wet bottom basin with stormwater quality treatment wetlands to filter and absorb
stormwater pollutants. Mitigation wetlands (separate from the treatment wetlands) were designed to replace existing non‐jurisdictional wetlands impacted by construction. A tree planting plan was developed as both a park amenity for the City of Jersey Village and to the promote areas of reforestation. Read more…

 

 

Bridgeland’s Purple Pipe & Water Reuse System

Investigation

Investment

Integration

The integration of sustainable infrastructure was a major consideration when planning the Bridgeland development, an 11,400-acre master-planned community in Northwest Harris County. The developer, Howard Hughes Corp., aimed to create a community that seamlessly blended natural features with modern facilities and amenities while being environmentally conscious. Read more…


Resources